The 101 Association, Inc.
For the preservation and enjoyment of 1928 to 1931 Indian Scout Motocycles
"You can't wear out an Indian Scout"
 

Front Brake Cable Soldering Advice

  • 20 Aug 2021 6:07 PM
    Message # 10944808

    I'm about ready to solder the front brake cable to the brass ferrule that sits inside the yoke that's connected to the brake cam operating lever.  I've got the adjuster all the way forward, and I've marked the position where the cable should be.  Any advice before I fire up the torch and start soldering?  Any lessons learned that I can avoid learning the hard way?

    Thanks,

    John

  • 21 Aug 2021 12:31 AM
    Reply # 10945352 on 10944808
    John Lindberg wrote:

    I'm about ready to solder the front brake cable to the brass ferrule that sits inside the yoke that's connected to the brake cam operating lever.  I've got the adjuster all the way forward, and I've marked the position where the cable should be.  Any advice before I fire up the torch and start soldering?  Any lessons learned that I can avoid learning the hard way?

    Thanks,

    John

    Make sure to use Acid Core solder  and flare the end of cable into the feral

    regards Phil  

  • 23 Aug 2021 8:37 PM
    Reply # 10951606 on 10944808
    Tim Raindle (Administrator)

    Hi John,

    Best way with a new cable is to solder it in the right area before cutting. This will stop the cut cable unravelling and spreading too much. Then you can poke it into the ferrule, leaving approx 1/16th of an inch protruding, and flare the end out, solder it into the ferrule/nipple, and leave a small hump of solder over the flared cable, easy to file smooth when cold.

    I like to set the ferrule in a wooden clothed peg, as a vice or grips will draw the heat out of the joint and make life harder. It is also easy once everything is tinned to move the ferrule up and down the end of the cable to the correct point with a little heat. A decent small soldering iron will do the trick easily enough. Wipe of any excess solder when still hot with a wet rag.

    Let us know how you go.

    T

    Last modified: 23 Aug 2021 8:38 PM | Tim Raindle (Administrator)
  • 25 Aug 2021 7:28 PM
    Reply # 10957089 on 10944808

    Here's a good tutorial.

    https://ariel-square-four.blogspot.com/2014/02/cables-cable-making.html

    I recommend bending double as many strands as possible, tuck and hammer them back in the nipple before final solder, even if the cavity is not a well like in the example above, but only a funnel/chamfer. I had a front brake nipple with a funnel/chamfer pulled off, in spite of spreading the end. A well is safer. Be thorough when doing this, it is important.

    Be very very careful if using a open flame torch, the cable strands are thin and fries very rapidly, becomes blue or black and then the cable end and a bit above the nipple is ruined. The cable becomes Very fragile! Better to heat a chunk of copper or suitable material with the torch and use that for a soldering iron, if not a big enough soldering iron or electricity is available. Even a regular hot plate is usable, either directly solder on or adding heat to a solder iron tip-

    For a soldering pot if you want that, a suitable small tin lid on a hot plate can be used.


    Last modified: 25 Aug 2021 8:33 PM | Carl-Erik Renquist
  • 26 Aug 2021 9:38 AM
    Reply # 10958355 on 10944808
    Tim Raindle (Administrator)

    Totally agree on the torch being too hot. 

    Also, I like to use these for the bottom connection, no soldering required on that end and you can adjust length a little. Original parts fit the cable better, repro one shown here may need a little hand filing of the grove to avoid crushing  the cable. Ok its a Harley part, but......

    https://www.45restoration.com/Products/Lower-Conection-Front-Brake-Cable__45172-28.aspx

    Also, Venhill cables sell cable parts and kits. A clutch cable kit has thicker stronger cables. 

    https://www.venhillusa.com/products/cable-kits-and-parts.html

    If you have a few different old bikes and are tired of buying brake and clutch cables that don't fit, their professional shop kit is well worth the few hundred bucks it costs.

  • 27 Aug 2021 5:27 AM
    Reply # 10960447 on 10958355
    Tim Raindle wrote:

    Totally agree on the torch being too hot. 

    Also, I like to use these for the bottom connection, no soldering required on that end and you can adjust length a little. Original parts fit the cable better, repro one shown here may need a little hand filing of the grove to avoid crushing  the cable. Ok its a Harley part, but......

    https://www.45restoration.com/Products/Lower-Conection-Front-Brake-Cable__45172-28.aspx

    Also, Venhill cables sell cable parts and kits. A clutch cable kit has thicker stronger cables. 

    https://www.venhillusa.com/products/cable-kits-and-parts.html

    If you have a few different old bikes and are tired of buying brake and clutch cables that don't fit, their professional shop kit is well worth the few hundred bucks it costs.

    I fully agree  with Tiim   This is by far the best solution  Both my 101s and my short Frame 28  are fitted with these clamps .


    Regards Phil

  • 28 Aug 2021 6:26 PM
    Reply # 10965022 on 10944808

    Thanks all for sharing your expertise.  The instructions from the Ariel folks are great.  My 101 came with the HD-style clamp installed.  When I attempted to put it back into operation today, the clamping nut split in half.  I'll get a "new" one and try that approach before I break out the soldering iron.

    John

  • 21 Sep 2021 8:15 AM
    Reply # 11106676 on 10944808

    aquasafe solder is much harder than the lead and tin mixture  (no lead in aquasafe) and i always use la-co flux (made in the US) aquasafe is available in Australia, don't know if it's available in the US, i flux the parts to be soldered first, then apply the soldering iron loaded with solder to the job.

 AMCA Chapter WebRing AMCA National 
Next >>       Random       Hub       << Prev
 
Classic Motorcycle Webring

Classic Motorcycle Webring

Join Now | Ring Hub | Random | << Prev | Next >>

Indian Motorcycles Webring
 
<< Prev | Hub | Rate | Next >>

Copyright © 2009 The 101 Association, Inc. All rights reserved. 

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software